What You Need to Know-Week of June 29th

The most important weekly updates for you to keep your community healthy

1. Guidance from the Governor: New Executive Order

Today, the Governor’s office announced three new executive orders due to rising COVID-19 cases in Arizona. These orders cover target start dates for school, operating restrictions for certain businesses, and protecting our health care professionals. The full text of the executive orders can be found on the Governor’s website.

Order #1:

  • Renews the “Good Samaritan Order” which protects paid and volunteer healthcare professionals working on the front line (see executive order for full guidance).
  • In effect until December 31, 2020.

Order #2: 

  • Operations for bars, gyms, movie theaters, waterparks and tubing will be temporarily paused (see executive order for full guidance).
  • Mass gatherings of 50 or more people should be limited. 
  • No more than 10 people should congregate in or near public or private pools. 
  • In effect until July 27, 2020, unless extended.

Order #3: 

  • Delays the first day of in-person school to a target date of August 17, 2020. Schools may begin on their planned start date prior to August 17th, only if through distance learning is implemented (see executive order for full guidance).
  • In effect until the start of in-person classes.

2. Pandemic Preparedness: Mask Mandates for Arizona Cities

All infected individuals, regardless of whether they are showing symptoms or not, CAN indeed transmit COVID-19. However, wearing a mask limits the potential spread of the virus, even from those who don’t know that they have been infected. When you wear a mask you are protecting everyone around you and to a lesser extent yourself. We all want to do our part to help reduce transmission and protect the people around us. This small, but impactful action protects the community and those most vulnerable to the virus.

In many cities, mask wearing is being mandated by city officials. For cities that do not have specific requirements, per CDC recommendations, everyone over age 2 without prohibitive medical conditions should wear a cloth face covering while in public spaces, especially indoors and outdoors when you cannot adhere to physical distancing. Each jurisdiction has slightly different mandates, so read the specifics for your city’s requirements carefully. Places of businesses may have additional requirements that vary from the city mandates.

Individual city requirements can be found in the table below. Click on your city/area name for a full list of exceptions and requirements.

Cities/AreasRequirementsWent into effectExceptions
AvondaleMasks are required at retail establishments, convenience stores, grocery stores, pharmacies, gyms, indoor sports or activity facilities, and medical offices.Sunday, June 21 at 12:01amThose under the age of 2

Individuals with disabilities and underlying medical conditions that would prohibit wearing a face mask.
BuckeyeBuckeye will be following the Maricopa county face mask mandate: Face masks are required in public places.Saturday, June 20th at 12amThose under the age of 6
CarefreeFace masks will be required in public places and in businesses.
Thursday, June 18th
Those under the age of 5
Casa GrandeEveryone is required to wear a mask in public.Saturday, June 20th at 6amThose under the age of 6
ChandlerFace coverings are required when in public places.Saturday, June 20thThose under the age of 6
Coconino CountyResidents and visitors are required to wear masks when social distancing isn’t possible.Saturday, June 20th at 12pmOnly applies to the unincorporated areas of the county, not within the cities and towns.
FlagstaffFace masks must be worn in public places.Saturday, June 20th at 8pmThose under the age of 5
Fountain HillsFountain Hills will be following the Maricopa county face mask mandate: Face masks are required in public places.Saturday, June 20th at 12am
The regulations do not apply to people in homes

Children under 2 years old

Restaurant patrons while they are eating and drinking

People walking or exercising outdoors (while maintaining six feet of distance)

When in a personal vehicle or other personal space

In settings where it is not practical or feasible to wear a Face Covering, including when obtaining or rendering goods or services, such dental services, medical treatments or while swimming

For persons who fall into the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidance for those who should not wear face coverings due to a medical or mental health condition or developmental disability
GilbertFace coverings are required in places where physical distancing isn’t possible, for both indoor and outdoor spaces.Friday, June 19th at 5 pmThose who cannot wear a face covering due to a medical or behavioral condition

Children under 6 years of age

Restaurant patrons while they are dining

When complying with directions of law enforcement officers

Where it is not practical/feasible to wear a face covering, such as the receipt of dental services or while swimming

Anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance
GlendalePeople are required to wear a face covering in public.Saturday, June 20th at 12:01amThose under the age of 6
GoodyearEveryone is required to wear a face mask in public.Saturday, June 20thThose under the age of 6

Those with medical conditions 

Anyone exercising outdoors
GuadalupePeople are required to wear a face covering while in public.Friday, June 19thThose under the age of 6
Litchfield ParkPeople are required to wear a face covering in public spaces.Friday, June 19thThose under the age of 4
Maricopa CountyFace masks are required in public places.Saturday, June 20th at 12amRules don’t apply for cities within the county, only in unincorporated areas

Those under the age of 6
MesaFace masks are required in public.
FAQ can be found here.
Monday, June 22Those under the age of 6

Private and charter schools

Those who have a medical, mental health, or developmental condition that prohibits them from wearing a face covering

Restaurant and bar patrons (while eating or drinking)

While inside a personal or commercial vehicle that is not public transportation

When exercising at a gym when physical distancing can be maintained

Inside a workspace not intended for use by the general public

Religious institutions or those with religious beliefs that would prohibit wearing a face covering

Those complying with directions from public safety employees and emergency responders
NogalesMasks are to be worn in public spaces.Thursday, June 18thThose under the age of 2

Not required while eating

Those exercising outdoors alone or swimming
Paradise ValleyParadise Valley will be following the Maricopa county face mask mandate: Face masks are required in public places.Saturday, June 20th at 12amThe regulations do not apply to people in their homes

Children under 2 years old

Restaurant patrons while they are eating and drinking

People walking or exercising outdoors (while maintaining six feet of distance)

When in a personal vehicle (with only household members), office or other personal space

Recognized medical exceptions (people do not have to provide proof)
PaysonMasks are to be worn in public spaces.Thursday, June 18th at 5pmThose under the age of 2
PeoriaFace masks are required in public places.Monday, June 22 at 6amThose under the age of 6
PhoenixEveryone over the age of six years old must wear a face mask while in a public area within Phoenix.Saturday, June 20 at 6amThose with a medical condition or disability who are under 6 years of age

Those with religious beliefs that prevent them from wearing a face covering

Restaurant patrons while they are eating/drinking

Those exercising outdoors (as long as physical distanding can be maintained)

Those engaging in team sports or exercising where it is not feasible to wear a mask

People in settings where it is not practical to wear a face covering (e.g., receiving dental services)
Queen CreekQueen Creek will be following the Maricopa county face mask mandate: Face masks are required in public places.Saturday, June 20th at 12amThe regulations do not apply to people in their homes

Children under 2 years old

Restaurant patrons while they are eating and drinking

People walking or exercising outdoors (while maintaining six feet of distance)

When in a personal vehicle (with only household members), office or other personal space

Recognized medical exceptions (people do not have to provide proof)
Santa Cruz County
County residents are required to wear face coverings while in public. This jurisdiction does not apply to cities within the county, unless indicated otherwise by the city.
Sunday, June 21stThose under the age of 2

Those at a food establishment may remove their masks while eating / drinking

Jail inmates

Those who are swimming

Law enforcement officers (if it is creating a risk)
ScottsdaleMasks are to be worn in public spaces.Friday, June 19thThose under the age of 6

Those exercising outdoors

Those with a medical condition that prohibits them from wearing a face covering
SurpriseFace coverings are required within the city when physical distancing is not possible.Saturday, June 20thThose aged 2 and under
TempeMasks are to be worn in public spaces. Thursday, June 18thIf religious beliefs conflict with wearing face coverings

Those exercising outdoors

Those under the age of 6

Those with certain medical conditions
TollesonMasks are to be worn in public spaces. Saturday, June 20 at 8amThose under the age of 2

Those with medical conditions that prohibit them from wearing a face covering
TucsonMasks are to be worn in public spaces. FAQ can be found here.Saturday, June 20th at 6amThose under the age of 2

Those exercising outdoors

Those with medical conditions that prohibit wearing a face covering

While in personal spaces
YumaPeople are required to wear a face mask (both indoors and outdoors) when physical distancing cannot be maintained.Thursday, June 18th at 1pmThose under the age of 2

Those exercising outdoors

Those unable to wear a face covering due to a medical condition

Cities that strongly recommend face coverings:
Apache Junction
Bullhead City
Cave Creek
El Mirage
Prescott

3. Testing Tips: Frequently Asked Questions for Diagnostic Testing

What is diagnostic testing and how does it differ from antibody testing?

  • Diagnostic testing (also called viral testing), tells you whether or not you currently have a COVID-19 infection. This type of test is administered through a respiratory swab (usually taken from the nose) and can take anywhere from a few minutes to a few days depending on the type of diagnostic test. There are two diagnostic tests available. PCR testing usually takes longer because the respiratory sample needs to be sent out to a laboratory to be analyzed, while antigen testing may take only a few minutes to receive results. 
  • Antibody testing on the other hand, detects whether someone has been exposed to the virus in the past and has developed COVID-19-specific antibodies.
  • The table below compares the available tests. 

Diagnostic TestingDiagnostic TestingSerologic Testing

Antigen Test
PCR TestAntibody Test
Other names for this test:Rapid testDiagnostic test, viral testSerologic test
What is being tested?Whether someone currently has an active COVID-19 infection. This test detects proteins that are associated with COVID-19.Whether someone currently has an active COVID-19 infection.This test detects genetic material of COVID-19.Any developed immune response to COVID-19.
What samples are usually taken?Respiratory swab (usually inside the nose). 

Newly developed saliva tests will be increasing in availability.
Respiratory swab (usually inside the nose)A blood sample
How long does it usually take to receive results?Usually a few minutesUsually a few daysUsually a few minutes (rapid tests) or up to several days (laboratory tests)
What does a positive result mean?You currently have COVID-19.You currently have COVID-19.You have likely had the virus in the past or have been previously exposed to COVID-19.

Why is diagnostic testing important?

  • The more individuals being tested, the better picture we have of the pandemic and the effects of the virus on ourselves, on our loved ones, and on our community.
  • Testing for infection allows you to isolate yourselves from others to keep from transmitting the virus.
  • It allows public health to contact you and identify others that need to quarantine because they have been exposed. 
  • Testing can help scientists and health professionals understand: 
    • How individuals are getting sick
    • How the virus spreads, and how quickly
    • The contagiousness of sick individuals
    • How to inform treatment options
    • How to best allocate healthcare resources
    • How to keep hospitals and health facilities informed about spread within a community to ensure resources are available (e.g., enough hospital beds).
  • Testing can help public health decide:
    • What kinds of prevention measures need to be enacted.
    • Whether or not the prevention strategies in place are working.
    • Where there are clusters of transmission
    • Which vulnerable populations need more testing or more support

Should I receive a diagnostic test for COVID-19?

  • If you are showing COVID-19 symptoms, it is important to get tested. 
  • If you have had close contact with someone who recently tested positive for COVID-19, it is also a good idea to get tested. Evidence suggests that the virus test (also called diagnostic, PCR, or antigen test) is the most accurate when someone is showing symptoms. 
    • You may not know you have been exposed until a public health professional called a contact tracer contacts you. You may want to get tested after they have contacted you. It is important to answer any call that says it is from the health department in Arizona OR one of the Universities; University of Arizona, Arizona State University or Northern Arizona University. The public health departments are working together with our universities to carry out contact tracing. They work as fast as they can to call everyone that has been identified as a contact to make sure they stay home to keep us all safe. 
    • For individuals who will go on to show symptoms, on average, symptoms usually appear 5-7 days after exposure, although it may take up to 14 days. Other infected individuals may not ever show symptoms despite being contagious. For information on the differences between these types of cases, please visit this link
    • If you have been exposed to COVID-19 and are not showing symptoms, you should assume that you are positive for the virus and are contagious to others. In these cases, you may get tested 5-7 days or more after your exposure, but you should be aware that your test result may not be accurate. For information on what daily precautions to take, visit this link.
  • If you are directed to get a test by a health facility for any reason (e.g., elective surgery), or your workplace requires you get tested, it is important to get tested.

How do I get tested?

State testing procedures vary by testing facility. To find a testing facility near you, visit this link. Most of the sites found at this link require pre-registration, so make sure to complete the registration form if this is necessary. If there is no pre-registration form to fill out, make sure to call ahead to the testing site to let them know you are coming.

Does it cost money?

It depends. Some facilities may charge a fee for COVID-19 diagnostic testing, some testing sites will take insurance to cover the testing cost either fully or partially, and others may provide testing free of charge as long as the tested individual meets criteria for a test (which may vary by location). Make sure to call your chosen testing facility to confirm their cost for testing.

What should I do while I am waiting for my diagnostic test result?

I got my COVID-19 diagnostic test result, what should I do now?

  • If you received a positive diagnostic test, you currently have COVID-19. You should stay home for 10 days and avoid contact with anyone after you receive your positive result. For information on what precautions to take, visit this link. As contact tracing can take time, notify anyone you were in close contact with since three days before symptom onset.
  • If you received a negative diagnostic test, you are less likely to have COVID-19 (if you received a test 5+ days after your exposure). If you get tested too early the test may not pick up the virus so it is important to wait until the right time for testing and you may need to get tested more than once. Because 20% of people that test negative may still have the virus you should still take the daily precautions necessary to prevent a COVID-19 infection, including staying home as much as possible and wearing a mask while in public.

The next update will cover more about face masks. If you would like to learn more about this and other topics related to COVID-19 in Arizona, please complete next week’s AZCOVIDTXT survey that you will receive via text in about a week.

View Updates from Past Weeks:
Update from week of June 22nd (English | Spanish)
Update from week of June 15th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of June 8th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of June 1st (English | Spanish)
Update from week of May 25th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of May 17th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of May 11th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of May 4th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of April 27th (English | Spanish)
Update from week of April 20th (English | Spanish)

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